Multimedia Photo Friday

Photo Friday: Star Guide

Refraction of crescent moon through a glass door. Photo by CG Photo Editor Elizabeth Linares.

The night sky has fascinated mankind since the dawn of time and with modern technology man can see deeper into the night sky than ever before. However, the Hubble satellite isn’t necessary for star gazing. A small telescope, binoculars or even the naked eye can show you a great deal of this galaxy where we live. College Green Magazine took a look at a few of the more easily visible and constant objects in the night and brought them here for your night time enjoyment. See if you can find these objects as you walk home from a night of studying at Alden Library!

Detail of the moon's terminator line as seen through a telescope. Photo by CG Photo Editor Elizabeth Linares.
One of the most well known astorism (unofficial constellation), the Big Dipper is almost perpendicular to the horizon in this season. Photo illustration by CG Photo Editor Elizabeth Linares.
Cassiopeia, the queen, is easily found by it's distinctive 'm' or 'w' in the high northwestern night sky. Photo illustration by CG Photo Editor Elizabeth Linares.
The famous Orion constellation is prominent in the winter sky with Betelgeuse and Rigel, it's bright magnitude one stars, and Bellatrix a magnitude two star. M42 is the Orion Nebula which can be seen even with smaller telescopes. Photo illustration by CG Photo Editor Elizabeth Linares.
Canis Major is one of Orion's hunting dogs. The magnitude zero star Sirius forms the collar of the dog and is the brightest star of the night sky. Photo illustration by CG Photo Editor Elizabeth Linares.
The twins Castor and Pollux of the zodiac can be seen high in the sky above Orion's eastern arm. Photo illustration by CG Photo Editor Elizabeth Linares.
Another member of the zodiac, Taurus is visible high in the night sky. Its brightest star is thought of as the eye of the bull, but it's name translates from Arabic as "the Follower" because it appears to follow the Pleiades. Photo illustration by CG Photo Editor Elizabeth Linares.
The Pleiades or Seven Sisters is another well known astrorism. It's easily found beneath the foot of Perseus and the head of Taurus. Photo illustration by CG Photo Editor Elizabeth Linares.
One of the great heroes of the night Perseus is seen near the zenith, the point of the sky directly overhead. Perseus is one of the sign posts that directs astronomers to the Pleiades. Photo illustration by CG Photo Editor Elizabeth Linares.